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State of Alaska
Official State Seal

Population:
686,293

Under 18:
182,218

Over 65:
47,935

Employed:
443,335

Land in SM:
571,951.26

Official Website

Acres of Farms:
900,715

Births:
10,459

Deaths:
3,168

Infant Deaths:
43

Property Crime:
20,124

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Alaska Birch Trees - eHow | How to Videos, Articles & More ...

Alaska Birch Trees. The Alaska birch tree, Betula neoalaskana, ... The birch tree is a deciduous tree that is part of the betulaceae family.
http://www.ehow.com/info_8111621_ala
ska-birch-trees.html



Facts About the Weeping Alaskan Cedar | eHow.com

Weeping Alaska-cedar trees may experience unsightly and potentially lethal ... The Alaskan weeping cedar is a distinct variety of the Alaskan cedar family of trees.
http://www.ehow.com/facts_5553238_we
eping-alaskan-cedar.html



How to Make a Totem Pole As a Family Tree | eHow.com

Totem poles originate in the Pacific Northwest all the way up the Canadian coast to Alaska. The native peoples of this region used totem poles to symbolically ...
http://www.ehow.com/how_5660301_make
-totem-pole-family-tree.html



Growth Size of the Alaskan Weeping Cypress | eHow.com

Alaska-cedar trees have a moderate growth rate. ... Cypress trees, part of the Cupressaceae family, grow in moist environments in northern temperate zones.
http://www.ehow.com/info_8555542_gro
wth-size-alaskan-weeping-cypress.html



What Is the Classification of Willow Trees? | eHow.com

Of the dicot trees in the United States, there are 25 families including the Salicaceae family, ... The Alaska willow, Salix alaxensis, is a major source of food ...
http://www.ehow.com/about_6533739_cl
assification-willow-trees_.html



Planting Advice for Alaskan Pine Trees | eHow

Planting Advice for Alaskan Pine Trees. Growing conifers in Alaska is challenging, even though non-native lodgepole pines and Siberian larch are as well distributed ...
http://www.ehow.com/how_7170487_plan
ting-advice-alaskan-pine-trees.html



Alaska Birch Trees | eHow - eHow | How to Videos, Articles ...

Alaska Birch Trees. The Alaska birch tree, Betula neoalaskana, is also called the Alaska white birch or Alaska paper birch. A small tree with a multitude of stems, it ...
http://www.ehow.com/info_8111621_ala
ska-birch-trees.html



How to Make a Totem Pole As a Family Tree | eHow

How to Make a Totem Pole As a Family Tree. Totem poles originate in the Pacific Northwest all the way up the Canadian coast to Alaska. The native peoples of this ...
http://www.ehow.com/how_5660301_make
-totem-pole-family-tree.html



Weeping Alaska Cedar | eHow - eHow | How to Videos, Articles ...

Weeping Alaska Cedar. The Weeping Alaska Cedar, scientific name Chamaecyparis nootkatensis, is a coniferous tree that naturally grows on the west coast of North ...
http://www.ehow.com/facts_6728984_we
eping-alaska-cedar.html



Facts About the Weeping Alaskan Cedar | eHow

Facts About the Weeping Alaskan Cedar. Weeping Alaska Cedar, or Chamaecyparis nootkatensis pendula, is a cultivated variant of the wild-growing Alaska yellow cedar.
http://www.ehow.com/facts_5553238_we
eping-alaskan-cedar.html